WALLPAPER BY ARTISTS

Ways to Wallpaper

WAYS TO WALLPAPER

As autumn draws in and schools start again we thought it would be a good time to pull together a few out of the ordinary decorating ideas for your walls. Hope these are helpful!

In Small Spaces

Installing wallpaper in small rooms such as a downstairs loo or powder room can have a big impact on what can otherwise be forgotten spaces. In such a small room we would advise applying wallpaper to all four walls. Emil Eve architects used our Lioness and Palms very effectively here above some emerald tiles. This is a great solution if you are concerned about the practicality of wallpaper in a bathroom but are nevertheless keen to introduce a bit of pattern and colour. And if you wanted to take it a step further, wallpaper on the ceiling can create a wonderfully theatrical experience and jewel-box effect. We used Lucky Leaf in this cloakroom which makes a trip to the loo an overall much brighter experience.

As a Frieze

Wallpaper above a picture rail might not be standard fare in the repertoire of decorating techniques but it can be a surprisingly effective visual trick. Rachel Chudley’s blue bathroom (photographed by Sean Oliver Myers) does this particularly well. Through using our Lioness & Palms on the tops of the walls and ceiling she creates a sort of lidded box that envelops you. The lovely B&B Chapel on the Green also used this technique. Here our Dressing & Undressing paper creates a virtual picture rail drawing your eyes upwards to the high ceilings.

Pitched Roof

There’s something dramatic about papering a slanted ceiling. For those with a pitched ceiling in your home, applying wallpaper on the shortest wall leading up to the pitch and on the ceiling itself can create a canopy of sorts. Here, Old Oak was used to highlight and draw attention to the slant. Stripes would work just as well – as you would find in a circus tent – but the waves here help to soften the effect ever so slightly.

Alcoves, Cupboards & Shelves

If you are a little scared of pattern, lining the walls of your cabinets, cupboard doors, shelves or alcoves is a neat way to introduce pattern into the home without the commitment and cost of an entirely wallpapered room. More like a short-term relationship, the two examples above both have a big impact but are easy enough to change if it’s not working or you’ve frankly just had enough!

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